This chapter discusses the various network interfaces on a switch running Cumulus Linux, how to configure various interface-level settings (if needed) and some troubleshooting commands.

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Interface Types

Cumulus Linux exposes network interfaces for several types of physical and logical devices:

  • lo, network loopback device
  • ethN, switch management port(s), for out of band management only
  • swpN, switch front panel ports
  • (optional) brN, bridges (IEEE 802.1Q VLANs)
  • (optional) bondN, bonds (IEEE 802.3ad link aggregation trunks, or port channels)

Interface Settings

Each physical network interface has a number of configurable settings:

Almost all of these settings are configured automatically for you, depending upon your switch ASIC, although you must always set MTU manually. 

You can only set MTU for logical interfaces. If you try to set auto-negotiation, duplex mode or link speed for a logical interface, an unsupported error gets returned.

Differences between Broadcom-based and Mellanox-based Switches

On a Broadcom-based switch, all you need to do is enable auto-negotiation. Once enabled, Cumulus Linux automatically configures the link speed, duplex mode and forward error correction (FEC, if the cable or optic requires it) for every switch port, based on the switch model and cable or optic used on the port, as listed in the table below.

Ports are always automatically configured on a Mellanox-based switch, with one exception — you only need to configure is MTU. You don't even need to enable auto-negotation, as the Mellanox firmware configures everything for you. 

Enabling Auto-negotiation

To configure auto-negotiation for a Broadcom-based switch, set link-autoneg to on for all the switch ports. For example, to enable auto-negotiation for swp1 through swp52:

cumulus@switch:~$ net add interface swp1-52 link autoneg on
cumulus@switch:~$ net pending
cumulus@switch:~$ net commit

Any time you enable auto-negotiation, Cumulus Linux restores the default configuration settings specified in the table below.

By default on a Broadcom-based switch, auto-negotiation is disabled — except on 10G and 1G BASE-T switches, where it's required for links to work at all. And for RJ45-SFP converters, you need to manually configure the settings as described in the default settings table below.

If you disable it later or never enable it, then you have to configure the duplex, FEC and link speed settings manually using NCLU — see the relevant sections below. The default speed if you disable auto-negotiation depends on the type of connector used with the port. For example, a QSFP28 optic defaults to 100G, while a QSFP+ optic defaults to 40G and SFP+ defaults to 10G. 

You cannot or should not disable auto-negotiation off for any type of copper cable, including:

  • 10G BASE-T
  • 10G DAC
  • 40G DAC
  • 100G DAC

However, RJ-45 (10/100/1000 BASE-T) adapters do not work with auto-negotiation enabled. You must manually configure these ports using the settings below (link-autoneg=off, link-speed=1000|100|10, link-duplex=full|half).

Depending upon the connector used for a port, enabling auto-negotiation also enables forward error correction (FEC), if the cable requires it (see the table below). FEC always adjusts for the speed of the cable. However, you cannot disable FEC separately using NCLU.

Default Interface Configuration Settings

On a Broadcom-based switch, the configuration for each type of interface is described in the following table. Except as noted below, the settings for both sides of the link are expected to be the same.

If the other side of the link is running a version of Cumulus Linux earlier than 3.2, depending up on the interface type, auto-negotiation may not work on that switch. Cumulus Networks recommends you use the default settings on this switch in this case.

For Mellanox-based switches, the Spectrum firmware decides on the best settings based on the switch model and connector type.

SpeedAuto-negotiationFEC SettingManual Configuration Steps

Notes

10/100 Base-T (RJ45 SFP)

OffN/A (does not apply at this speed)
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 100
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg off
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg off
  link-speed 100
  • The module has two sets of electronics — the port side, which communicates to the switch ASIC, and the RJ45 side.
  • Auto-negotiation is always used on the RJ45 side of the link by the PHY built into the module. This is independent of the switch setting. Set link-autoneg to off.
  • Auto-negotiation needs to be enabled on the server side in this scenario.
10/100 Base-T on a 1G fixed copper portRecommended OnN/A
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 100
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg on
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg on
  link-speed 100
  • 10M or 100M speeds are possible with autoneg OFF on both sides. Testing on an Edge-Core AS4610-54P revealed the ASIC reporting autoneg as ON.
  • PoE may require autoneg to be ON.
1000BASE-T
(RJ45 SFP)
OffN/A
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 1000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg off
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg off
  link-speed 1000
  • The module has two sets of electronics — the port side, which communicates to the switch ASIC, and the RJ45 side.
  • Auto-negotiation is always used on the RJ45 side of the link by the PHY built into the module. This is independent of the switch setting. Set link-autoneg to off.
  • Auto-negotiation needs to be enabled on the server side.
1G BASE-T on a 1G fixed copper portOnN/A
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 1000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg on
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg on
  link-speed 1000
 
1G BASE-T on a 10G fixed copper portOnN/A
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 1000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg on
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg on
  link-speed 1000
 

1000BASE-SX,
1000BASE-LX,
1000BASE-CX
(1G Fiber)

Recommended OnN/A
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 1000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg on
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg on
  link-speed 1000
  • Without auto-negotiation, the link stays up when there is a single fiber break.
10G BASE-T fixed copper portOnN/A 
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 10000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg on
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg on
  link-speed 10000
 
10G BASE-CR,
10G BASE-LR,
10G BASE-SR,
10G AOC
OffN/A
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 10000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg off
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg off
  link-speed 10000
 
40G BASE-CR4Recommended OnDisable it
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 40000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg on
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg on
  link-speed 40000
  • 40G standards mandate auto-negotiation should be enabled for DAC connections.
40G BASE-SR4,
40G BASE-LR4,
40G AOC
OffDisable it
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 40000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg off
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg off
  link-speed 40000
 
100G BASE-CR4Onauto-negotiated
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 100000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg on
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg on
  link-speed 100000
 
100G BASE-SR4,
100G AOC
OffRS 
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 100000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg off
$ net add interface swp1 link fec rs
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg off
  link-speed 100000
  link-fec rs
 
100G BASE-LR4OffNone stated
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 100000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg off
$ net add interface swp1 link fec off
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg off
  link-speed 100000
  link-fec off
 
25G BASE-CROnauto-negotiated*
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 25000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg on
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg on
  link-speed 25000
 

25G BASE-SR

OffRS*
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 25000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg off
$ net add interface swp1 link fec baser
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg off
  link-speed 25000
  link-fec baser
  • Tomahawk cannot do RS on a single channel, only Base-R/FC/FireCode/Type74, which violates the 802.3by specification for 25G.

25G BASE-LROffNone stated
$ net add interface swp1 link speed 25000
$ net add interface swp1 link autoneg off
$ net add interface swp1 link fec off
Configuration in /etc/network/interfaces
auto swp1
iface swp1
  link-autoneg off
  link-speed 25000
  link-fec off
 

Port Speed and Duplexing

Cumulus Linux supports both half- and full-duplex configurations. Supported port speeds include 100M, 1G, 10G, 25G, 40G, 50G and 100G. If you need to manually set the speed on a Broadcom-based switch, set it in terms of Mbps, where the setting for 1G is 1000, 40G is 40000 and 100G is 100000, for example.

The duplex mode setting defaults to full. You only need to specify link duplex if you want half-duplex mode.

Example Port Speed and Duplexing Configuration

The following NCLU commands configure the port speed for the swp1 interface:

cumulus@switch:~$ net add interface swp1 link speed 10000
cumulus@switch:~$ net pending
cumulus@switch:~$ net commit

The above commands create the following /etc/network/interfaces code snippet:

auto swp1
iface swp1
   link-speed 10000

Port Speed Limitations

Ports can be configured to one speed less than their maximum speed.

Switch port TypeLowest Configurable Speed
1G100 Mb
10G1 Gigabit (1000 Mb)
40G10G*
100G50G & 40G (with or without breakout port), 25G*, 10G*

*Requires the port to be converted into a breakout port. See below.

MTU

Interface MTU (maximum transmission unit) applies to traffic traversing the management port, front panel/switch ports, bridge, VLAN subinterfaces and bonds — in other words, both physical and logical interfaces.

MTU is the only interface setting that must be set manually. 

In Cumulus Linux, ifupdown2 assigns 1500 as the default MTU setting. To change the setting, run:

cumulus@switch:~$ net add interface swp1 mtu 9000
cumulus@switch:~$ net pending
cumulus@switch:~$ net commit

Some switches may not support the same maximum MTU setting in hardware for both the management interface (eth0) and the data plane ports.

MTU for a Bridge

The MTU setting is the lowest MTU setting of any interface that is a member of that bridge (that is, every interface specified in bridge-ports in the bridge configuration in the interfaces file), even if another bridge member has a higher MTU value. There is no need to specify an MTU on the bridge. Consider this bridge configuration:

auto bridge
iface bridge
    bridge-ports bond1 bond2 bond3 bond4 peer5
    bridge-vids 100-110
    bridge-vlan-aware yes

In order for bridge to have an MTU of 9000, set the MTU for each of the member interfaces (bond1 to bond 4, and peer5), to 9000 at minimum.

Use MTU 9216 for a bridge

Two common MTUs for jumbo frames are 9216 and 9000 bytes. The corresponding MTUs for the VNIs would be 9166 and 8950. 

When configuring MTU for a bond, configure the MTU value directly under the bond interface; the configured value is inherited by member links/slave interfaces. If you need a different MTU on the bond, set it on the bond interface, as this ensures the slave interfaces pick it up. There is no need to specify MTU on the slave interfaces. 

VLAN interfaces inherit their MTU settings from their physical devices or their lower interface; for example, swp1.100 inherits its MTU setting from swp1. Hence, specifying an MTU on swp1 ensures that swp1.100 inherits swp1's MTU setting.

If you are working with VXLANs, the MTU for a virtual network interface (VNI) must be 50 bytes smaller than the MTU of the physical interfaces on the switch, as those 50 bytes are required for various headers and other data. You should also consider setting the MTU much higher than the default 1500. 

Example MTU Configuration

In general, the policy file specified above handles default MTU settings for all interfaces on the switch. If you need to configure a different MTU setting for a subset of interfaces, use NCLU.

The following commands configure an MTU minimum value of 9000 on swp1:

cumulus@switch:~$ net add interface swp1 mtu 9000
cumulus@switch:~$ net pending
cumulus@switch:~$ net commit

These commands create the following code snippet:

auto swp1
iface swp1
   mtu 9000

You must take care to ensure there are no MTU mismatches in the conversation path. MTU mismatches will result in dropped or truncated packets, degrading or blocking network performance.

To view the MTU setting, use net show interface <interface>:

cumulus@switch:~$ net show interface swp1
    Name    MAC                Speed      MTU  Mode
--  ------  -----------------  -------  -----  ---------
UP  swp1    44:38:39:00:00:04  1G        1500  Access/L2

Setting a Policy for Global System MTU

For a global policy to set MTU, create a policy document (called mtu.json here) like the following:

cat /etc/network/ifupdown2/policy.d/mtu.json
{
 "address": {"defaults": { "mtu": "9216" },
             "iface_defaults": {"eth0": {"mtu": "4242"}}
            }
}

Not all platforms have the ability to set the a High MTU value on the Eth0 management interface. To show a logical default, we've done the above.

The policies and attributes in any file in /etc/network/ifupdown2/policy.d/ override the default policies and attributes in /var/lib/ifupdown2/policy.d/.

Creating a Default Policy for Various Interface Settings

Instead of configuring these settings for each individual interface, you can specify a policy for all interfaces on a switch, or tailor custom settings for each interface. Create a file in /etc/network/ifupdown2/policy.d/, like in the following example (called address.json), and populate the settings accordingly:

cumulus@switch:~$ cat /etc/network/ifupdown2/policy.d/address.json
{ 
    "ethtool": {
        "defaults": {
            "link-duplex": "full"
        },
        "iface_defaults": {
            "swp1": {
                "link-autoneg": "on", 
                "link-speed": "1000"
            }, 
            "swp50": {
                "link-autoneg": "off", 
                "link-speed": "10000"
            }
        }
    },
    "address": {
        "defaults": { "mtu": "9000" }
    }
}

Configuring Breakout Ports

Cumulus Linux has the ability to:

  • Break out 100G switch ports into the following with breakout cables:
    • 2x50G, 4x25G, 4x10G
  • Break out 40G switch ports into four separate 10G ports for use with breakout cables.
  • Combine (also called aggregating or ganging) four 10G switch ports into one 40G port for use with a breakout cable (not to be confused with a bond).

To configure a 4x25G breakout port, first configure the port to break out then set the link speed:

cumulus@switch:~$ net add interface swp3 breakout 4x
cumulus@switch:~$ net add interface swp3s0-3 link speed 25000
cumulus@switch:~$ net pending
cumulus@switch:~$ net commit

On Mellanox switches, you need to disable the next port (see below). In this example, you would also run the following before committing the update:

cumulus@switch:~$ net add interface swp4 breakout disabled

These commands create 4 interfaces in the /etc/network/interfaces file named as follows:

cumulus@switch:~$ cat /etc/network/interfaces
 
...
 
auto swp3s0
iface swp3s0

auto swp3s1
iface swp3s1

auto swp3s2
iface swp3s2

auto swp3s3
iface swp3s3
 
...

When you commit your change configuring the breakout ports, switchd restarts to apply the changes. The restart interrupts network services.

The breakout port configuration is stored in the /etc/cumulus/ports.conf file. 

/etc/cumulus/ports.conf varies across different hardware platforms. Check the current list of supported platforms on the hardware compatibility list.

A snippet from the /etc/cumulus/ports.conf on a Dell S6000 switch (with a Trident II+ ASIC) where swp3 is broken out as above looks like this:

cumulus@switch:~$ cat /etc/cumulus/ports.conf 
# ports.conf --
#
# This file controls port aggregation and subdivision.  For example, QSFP+
# ports are typically configurable as either one 40G interface or four
# 10G/1000/100 interfaces.  This file sets the number of interfaces per port
# while /etc/network/interfaces and ethtool configure the link speed for each
# interface.
#
# You must restart switchd for changes to take effect.
#
# The DELL S6000 has:
#     32 QSFP ports numbered 1-32
#     These ports are configurable as 40G, split into 4x10G ports or
#     disabled.
#
#     The X pipeline covers QSFP ports 1 through 16 and the Y pipeline
#     covers QSFP ports 17 through 32.
#
#     The Trident2 chip can only handle 52 logical ports per pipeline.
#
#     This means 13 is the maximum number of 40G ports you can ungang
#     per pipeline, with the remaining three 40G ports set to
#     "disabled". The 13 40G ports become 52 unganged 10G ports, which
#     totals 52 logical ports for that pipeline.
#
# QSFP+ ports
#
# <port label 1-32> = [4x10G|40G|disabled]
1=40G
2=40G
3=4x
4=40G
5=40G
6=40G
7=40G
8=40G
9=40G
10=40G
11=40G
12=40G
13=40G
14=40G
15=40G
16=40G
17=40G
18=40G
19=40G
20=40G
21=40G
22=40G
23=40G
24=40G
25=40G
26=40G
27=40G
28=40G
29=40G
30=40G
31=40G
32=40G

Notice that you can break out any of the 100G ports into a variety of options: four 10G ports, four 25G ports or two 50G ports. Keep in mind that you cannot have more than 128 total logical ports on a Broadcom switch. 

The Mellanox SN2700, SN2700B, SN2410, and SN2410B switches both have a limit of 64 logical ports in total. However, if you want to break out to 4x25G or 4x10G, you must configure the logical ports as follows:

  • You can only break out odd-numbered ports into 4 logical ports. 
  • You must disable the next even-numbered port. 

These restrictions do not apply to a 2x50G breakout configuration.

For example, if you have a 100G Mellanox SN2700 switch and break out port 11 into 4 logical ports, you must disable port 12 by running net add interface swp12 breakout disabled, which results in this configuration in /etc/cumulus/ports.conf:

...
 
11=4x
12=disabled

...

There is no limitation on any port if interfaces are configured in 2x50G mode.

Here is an example showing how to configure breakout cables for the Mellanox Spectrum SN2700.

Combining Four 10G Ports into One 40G Port

You can gang (or aggregate) four 10G ports into one 40G port for use with a breakout cable, provided you follow these requirements:

  • You must gang four 10G ports in sequential order. For example, you cannot gang swp1, swp10, swp20 and swp40 together.
  • The ports must be in increments of four, with the starting port being swp1 (or swp5, swp9, or so forth); so you cannot gang swp2, swp3, swp4 and swp5 together.

For example, to gangs swp1 through swp4 into a 40G port, run: 

cumulus@switch:~$ net add int swp1-4 breakout /4 
cumulus@switch:~$ net pending
cumulus@switch:~$ net commit

These commands create the following configuration snippet in the /etc/cumulus/ports.conf file: 

# SFP+ ports#
# <port label 1-48> = [10G|40G/4]
1=40G/4
2=40G/4
3=40G/4
4=40G/4
5=10G

Logical Switch Port Limitations

100G and 40G switches can support a certain number of logical ports, depending upon the manufacturer; these include:

  • Mellanox SN2700 and SN2700B switches
  • Switches with Broadcom Tomahawk, Trident II and Trident II+ chipsets (check the HCL)

Before you configure any logical/unganged ports on a switch, check the limitations listed in /etc/cumulus/ports.conf; this file is specific to each manufacturer.

For example, the Dell S6000 ports.conf file indicates the logical port limitation like this: 

# ports.conf --
#
# This file controls port aggregation and subdivision.  For example, QSFP+
# ports are typically configurable as either one 40G interface or four
# 10G/1000/100 interfaces.  This file sets the number of interfaces per port
# while /etc/network/interfaces and ethtool configure the link speed for each
# interface.
#
# You must restart switchd for changes to take effect.
#
# The DELL S6000 has:
#     32 QSFP ports numbered 1-32
#     These ports are configurable as 40G, split into 4x10G ports or
#     disabled.
#
#     The X pipeline covers QSFP ports 1 through 16 and the Y pipeline
#     covers QSFP ports 17 through 32.
#
#     The Trident2 chip can only handle 52 logical ports per pipeline.
#
#     This means 13 is the maximum number of 40G ports you can ungang
#     per pipeline, with the remaining three 40G ports set to
#     "disabled". The 13 40G ports become 52 unganged 10G ports, which
#     totals 52 logical ports for that pipeline.

The means the maximum number of ports for this Dell S6000 is 104.

Mellanox SN2700 and SN2700B switches have a limit of 64 logical ports in total. However, the logical ports must be configured in a specific way. See the note above.

Using ethtool to Configure Interfaces

The Cumulus Linux ethtool command is an alternative for configuring interfaces as well as viewing and troubleshooting them.

For example, to manually set link speed, auto-negotiation, duplex mode and FEC on swp1, run: 

cumulus@switch:~$ sudo ethtool -s swp1 speed 25000 autoneg off duplex full
cumulus@switch:~$ sudo ethtool --set-fec swp1 encoding off

To view the FEC setting on an interface, run:

cumulus@switch:~$ sudo ethtool --show-fec swp1FEC parameters for swp1:
Auto-negotiation: off
FEC encodings : RS

Verification and Troubleshooting Commands

Statistics

High-level interface statistics are available with the net show interface command:

cumulus@switch:~$ net show interface swp1

    Name    MAC                Speed      MTU  Mode
--  ------  -----------------  -------  -----  ---------
UP  swp1    44:38:39:00:00:04  1G        1500  Access/L2


Vlans in disabled State
-------------------------
br0


Counters      TX    RX
----------  ----  ----
errors         0     0
unicast        0     0
broadcast      0     0
multicast      0     0


LLDP
------  ----  ---------------------------
swp1    ====  44:38:39:00:00:03(server01)

Low-level interface statistics are available with ethtool:

cumulus@switch:~$ sudo ethtool -S swp1
NIC statistics:
     HwIfInOctets: 21870
     HwIfInUcastPkts: 0
     HwIfInBcastPkts: 0
     HwIfInMcastPkts: 243
     HwIfOutOctets: 1148217
     HwIfOutUcastPkts: 0
     HwIfOutMcastPkts: 11353
     HwIfOutBcastPkts: 0
     HwIfInDiscards: 0
     HwIfInL3Drops: 0
     HwIfInBufferDrops: 0
     HwIfInAclDrops: 0
     HwIfInBlackholeDrops: 0
     HwIfInDot3LengthErrors: 0
     HwIfInErrors: 0
     SoftInErrors: 0
     SoftInDrops: 0
     SoftInFrameErrors: 0
     HwIfOutDiscards: 0
     HwIfOutErrors: 0
     HwIfOutQDrops: 0
     HwIfOutNonQDrops: 0
     SoftOutErrors: 0
     SoftOutDrops: 0
     SoftOutTxFifoFull: 0
     HwIfOutQLen: 0

Querying SFP Port Information

You can verify SFP settings using  ethtool -m . The following example shows the output for 1G and 10G modules:

cumulus@switch:~# sudo ethtool -m | egrep '(swp|RXPower :|TXPower :|EthernetComplianceCode)'

swp1: SFP detected
              EthernetComplianceCodes : 1000BASE-LX
              RXPower : -10.4479dBm
              TXPower : 18.0409dBm
swp3: SFP detected
              10GEthernetComplianceCode : 10G Base-LR
              RXPower : -3.2532dBm
              TXPower : -2.0817dBm

Caveats and Errata

Timeout Error on Quanta LY8 and LY9 Switches

On Quanta T5048-LY8 and T3048-LY9 switches, an "Operation timed out" error occurs while removing and reinserting QSFP module. 

The QSPFx2 module cannot be removed while the switch is powered on, as it is not hot-swappable. However, if this occurs, you can get the link to come up; however, this involves restarting switchd , which disrupts your network.

On the T3048-LY9, run the following commands:

cumulus@switch:~$ sudo echo 0 > qsfpd_power_enable/value
cumulus@switch:~$ sudo rmmod quanta_ly9_rangeley_platform 
cumulus@switch:~$ sudo modprobe quanta_ly9_rangeley_platform
cumulus@switch:~$ sudo systemctl restart switchd.service

On the T5048-LY8, run the following commands:

cumulus@switch:~$ sudo echo 0 > qsfpd_power_enable/value
cumulus@switch:~$ sudo systemctl restart switchd.service

swp33 and swp34 Disabled on Some Switches

The front SFP+ ports (swp33 and swp34) are disabled in Cumulus Linux on the following switches:

  • Dell Z9100-ON
  • Penguin Arctica 3200-series switches (the 3200C, 3200XL and 3200XLP)
  • Supermicro SSE-C3632S

These ports appear as disabled in the /etc/cumulus/ports.conf file. 

Related Information

2 Comments

  1. Minor typo:

     

    Example Port Speed and Duplexing Configuration

     

    cumulus@switch:~$ net add interface swp1 link-speed 10000

    cumulus@switch:~$ net add interface link-duplex full

    cumulus@switch:~$ net pending

    cumulus@switch:~$ net commit

     

    Should read:

    net add interface swp1 link-duplex full

     

     

    1. Good catch, thanks! I fixed it.